Art We Purchase

 


 

Group of Seven & their contemporaries

 



Canadian Group of Painters

A group of 20th century Canadian artists formed in Toronto as a successor to the Group of Seven. Its policy was “to encourage and foster the growth of art in Canada which has a national character”. Its first exhibition was held in Atlantic City, New Jersey, in the summer of 1933 and its second at the Art Gallery of Toronto in the following November. The group expanded and many of the best-known Canadian artists exhibited with it from the 1930s to the 1960s. The group was disbanded in 1969.

 

Members of The Canadian Group of Painters



 

Painters Eleven

A group of Toronto abstract painters active from 1953 to 1960. The painters had little in common aside from being abstract painters. This is the reason for the generic name they chose for their group. Painters Eleven were united in their desire to promote abstract art at a time when doing so was not popular. More information available at: www.painters-eleven.com

 

Members of Painters Eleven

 

Beaver Hall Group and Associates

The Beaver Hall Group was formed to educate the public about Canadian art and to establish a market for their art through exhibitions. This first group only existed for two years between 1920-1922. It consisted of nineteen Montreal artists whose studios were at 305 Beaver Hall Hill. After the group disbanded for financial reasons some of the women artists still used the studios. They were joined by other women artists and this group of painters was later to become known as The Beaver Hall Hill Group.

 

Members of the Beaver Hall Group



 

Quebec Modern

The most important group of Painters in Quebec in the late 1940s through the mid-1950s were the Automatistes. Paul-Emile Borduas was mainly responsible for bringing this group of painters together: Marcel Barbeau, Pierre Gauvreau, Fernand Leduc, Jean-Paul Mousseau, Marcelle Ferron, Jean-Paul Riopelle. This group of artists was bound by their passionate belief in modernism and especially in intellectual freedom. In 1948 they published the manifesto, Refus Global, which was an opportunity to express their deeply held beliefs. 1955 is generally considered the beginning of the Post Automatistes period. It includes artists such as Jean McEwen, Rita Letendre, Lise Gervais, Guy Michon, Guido Molinari, Claude Tousignant, Leon Bellefleur and others.

 

Members of the Quebec Modern Group

 

 



 

Contact

Lynda M. Shearer
55 Avenue Rd., Suite 2975
Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5R 3L2
Phone: 416-774-8575
Email: canadianart@rogers.com

Contact us at canadianart@rogers.com if you wish to sell. Phone 416-774-8575